Tag Archives: usd

Weekly Commodity Strategy Review

Our first full week of the year puts the US Dollar Index on our radar as the most speculatively overpopulated market. Our piece for TraderPlanet took a look at this even as the Index itself continues to rally.

Continue reading Weekly Commodity Strategy Review

Currency Reversal on Scottish Vote

Today’s Scottish secession vote takes a 300-year-old issue and covers it with 21st century journalism. There’s hardly any angle that hasn’t been talked to death. Surprisingly, I’ve found something of major importance leading up to the vote that isn’t being discussed anywhere. The commercial traders in the Commodity Futures Trading Commission’s weekly Commitment of Traders report are making a clear point that they collectively feel that the currency markets are about to tighten, rather than continuing to widen as they have for the last month or so.

Continue reading Currency Reversal on Scottish Vote

Global Uncertainty Strengthens Dollar

Five years ago the financial world was coming to an end. The stock market tanked and interest rates went negative due to the unsurpassed flight to safety in U.S. Treasuries. Most of this was due to greedy lending practices that claimed to be championing President Clinton’s thesis that everyone in America should be able to own a home. Lax lending requirements that were intended to get lower income earners into their own homes travelled up market and allowed upper middle and upper tier earners to refinance their houses at artificially low rates to buy second homes and Harley’s. Once again, misguided bureaucratic endeavors have been perverted by greed. The roaches in China are beginning to surface and the banking system stress tests in Europe are uncovering the depth of this five-year-old issue and once again, the primary beneficiary of these actions will be the U.S. Dollar.

Continue reading Global Uncertainty Strengthens Dollar

Trading’s Gut Check

Actively participating in the markets comes with the understanding that the trader’s gut will be checked frequently and deeply. The primary cause of this is the trader’s degree of certainty in an uncertain world. It’s been proven over and over again that once an individual feels that they have enough information to make a decision, they will. Additional information provided after the fact typically raises the degree of certainty that the correct decision was made, rather than raising the degree of accuracy. So, I sit in front of the Federal Reserve Board’s announcement this afternoon involved up to my eyeballs in the US Dollar, Euro currency, 10-year Treasury Notes and the Russell 2000 stock index.

Each one of these positions is the result of mechanical trading programs that I’ve developed, tested and traded. Therefore, there are no arbitrary decisions or adjustments to be made. This leaves me in front of the screens sitting on pins and needles waiting for a range of possibilities to materialize. Given my experience with the markets, I expect the outcome to be somewhere in the middle. Rarely does it turn out one sided either positively or, negatively.

Let’s review the possible outcomes and the gut wrenching turmoil that comes with sitting on several large positions as I try to close out the books for 2013. My oldest position on the books is short the Euro FX. I stand to profit if the Euro currency weakens against the US Dollar. I’m short the market near the top of its range based on my research into the Commitment of Traders Reports. I know that there’s about a 60% chance the Euro will back off these highs by about a penny and a half. However, the market’s continuing consolidation near these highs puts me in a position where I could be stopped out of the market with a loss even before the Fed announces its decision this afternoon. The market’s proximity to my stop loss order contributes greatly to my angst.

The opposing position to the Euro is my long US Dollar Index position. Again, I’m long the US Dollar Index against a basket of currencies, which is dominated by the Euro. If the Fed suggests that they will begin to taper quickly, the Dollar should rally. Pulling stimulus out of the economy will place fewer Dollars in future circulation thus, increasing the value of the Dollars already in the market. The Dollar would rally and the Euro would fall. Both of my currency positions would be profitable.

Tapering by the Fed would most likely crush my 10-year Note position. Frankly, the discretionary trader in me can create the strongest case for owning 10-year Notes and betting against taper talk. Based on my analysis of the commercial traders in the 10-year Note I fully expect any decline in Treasury prices to be short lived. Commercial traders have accumulated their largest net long position in the 10-year Note since April of 2005. Commercial traders have dominated the big moves in the Treasuries with uncanny accuracy. If they’re right about no taper talk this afternoon, Treasuries will rally substantially and I’ll profit from my position….while losing on my currency trades.

This leads to my final position. I use a pretty fancy program for developing my day trading systems. Whereas my swing-trading program is based on the fundamental data inferred from the collective positions of the markets’ participants, my day trading programs are strictly technical. Knowing that the markets will unfailingly put a man to the test, it should come as no surprise that my day trading programs now have me long two units of the Russell 2000 stock index heading into this afternoon’s announcement. Furthermore, while I have some expectations of how the currencies and Treasuries will react to the Fed’s decision, the stock market’s reaction is far less predictable. If the Fed tapers, the stock market may rally further based on the assumption of a strong economy leading to further gains. However, the collective reaction could very well be violently lower as tapering could signal the end of the free money that many believe has fueled the rally to this point.

Discretionary traders face conflicting data like this all of the time and pick and choose which markets they’re in and when they’re in them. Systematic traders follow the signals generated by their programs without question. The cruelest aspect of trading is the market’s uncanny ability to seek out a traders’ weak spot and twist agony’s knife. I’ve been actively trading for more than 20 years and the trepidation of a pending report never goes away. This is where the classic line, “Plan your trade. Trade your plan” has the most value. Remember, additional information acquired after the fact doesn’t increase the odds of being right, it simply tricks the mind into greater certainty of the existing thought pattern.

Market Reactions to Debt Ceiling Changes

The ongoing budget and debt ceiling issues have arguably become as contentious as the Trayvon Martin case in social media. This is as vocally divided as I’ve seen my social media feeds. The left claims that the Republicans are solely to blame for our issues while the right insists we cannot spend forever what we haven’t got. Personally, I think both sides have their heads shoved very deeply up a warm and dark bodily cavity. While Congress argues about how to spend our money and money we haven’t got, they receive a lifetime’s salary plus benefits for 4-6 years of work yet have the nerve to use the term, “welfare state,” in public.

Whether you agree with the left, right or somewhere in the middle is irrelevant in the world of managing finances and trading. What matters is empirical data, not conjecture. A quick survey clearly shows that the economy is starting to slow due to the government shutdown. Consumer confidence is plummeting along with Congress’ approval rating. Government loans are being stalled for small businesses. Mortgages are stalling because government guarantees can’t be secured. Customs is turning into a choke point for global trade as inspections can’t be done and clearances can’t be granted. These are all quantifiable drags on our economy and will be reflected in lower GDP numbers.

The previous points are all uselessly valid. We don’t trade US Customs volume and our assets aren’t invested in Brazilian oranges left rotting at a dock. Our assets are directly placed in the US financial markets. I’ve spent the last week compiling a spreadsheet of debt ceiling negotiations and raises (there haven’t been any decreases) from the last twenty years and compared it to the most likely assets to be affected: interest rates, the US Dollar, gold and the S&P 500. Professors always say that economic choices are made, “at the margin.” Our philosophy has always been to stay ahead of the margin calls in the first place.

The debt ceiling has been raised 18 times since 1993. I chose this start date because it gives us 20 years worth of data during the most politicized portion of our history. Furthermore, the past twenty years have participated in the boom of the information age where the average person on the street has had more and more access to more and more information than ever. This allows all of us to make investment decisions based on fully formed opinions on events as they unfold. Therefore, the data set should be representative of the current investment climate.

Based on what has happened in the past, how can we best position ourselves for the future? Unfortunately, the data is mixed, at best. Because I’m old school and still do charting and modeling by hand, I chose a simple premise. “Where did the markets close the day before the debt ceiling was raised and where were they trading ten days later?” The range of results varied little by direction. The most predictable asset class is the interest rate sector by using the 10-year Treasury Note as a proxy. Ten year Treasury Notes traded lower (higher yields) 11 out of 18 times. This seems logical as raising the debt ceiling should force us to pay more in future obligations. It is worth noting that the declines in the 10-year Note came against the backdrop of a 25-year bull run in the interest rate sector.

The S&P 500 was the second most bearish market as it was lower ten days after the announcement in 10 out of 18 instances by an average of 1.6%. The S&P also retained its typical character of panic sell-offs. The largest gain was only 4.82% in May of 2003 while there were four occurrences of losses greater than 5%. Two were greater than 10%. The largest 10-day loss was a whopping 22.7%. Therefore, raising the debt ceiling and conducting government business as usual is not always a positive for the stock market.

The lone bull in the markets examined was the US Dollar. The slight bullishness in the US Dollar surprised me. The Dollar was higher in 10 out of 18 instances by an average of 1.3%. This is where multiple types of analysis really work together. Last week, we suggested that the Dollar is setting up for a downward trending run. I stand by that analysis. Monday, October 7th, Trader Planet published a piece I wrote on the counter trend bounce typically found in the US dollar after multiple moves to new 30-day lows. The Dollar situation as a whole confirms this theory. I expect the Dollar to rally short-term but fall over the course of time.

Gold was the final market we went into. I didn’t expect to find much here and I didn’t. Perhaps, the biggest point to be made here is that anyone trying to talk you into buying gold because the government is failing, inflation is coming, the Dollar is dying, etc must have a hidden agenda. The data simply doesn’t support the sales pitch. In fact, the biggest moves in the post debt ceiling adjustments in gold were to the downside. The general direction however remains a coin toss as the gold market moved up and down with equal frequency over the last 18 instances.

Finally, there’s one last point to be made of historical proportion and I have to credit my brilliant nephew, Erik VanDootingh for tipping me off to it ahead of the news curve. The markets are scared. Big, BIG money is scared. This can best be measured by the difference between the interest rates that the US government is paying for loans versus what international banks are charging to borrow from each other. Technically, this is the spread between Treasury Bill rates and LIBOR (London Interbank Overnight Lending Rate). For the first time in history, including the 2008-2009 implosion, our government is being charged a higher interest rate to borrow money than banks are charging each other. Interest rates are based on risk. The higher the risk, the higher the rate charged. Let that sink in awhile as you ponder, “too big to fail.”

Insidious Effects of the Dollar’s Decline

The United States is home to the largest and most liquid investment markets in the world. There’s hardly a market one can think of that isn’t exchange listed. This has made the United States the primary destination for excess global capital placement whether it has gone towards the relative safety of government bonds or been more aggressively allocated towards stocks, ETF’s or even the futures markets. The final destination of the investible funds is less important than the singular characteristic that all these investments have in common. They’re denominated in US Dollars and the Dollar’s value may be more meaningful than the underlying asset class.

Investment securities are not protected from the vagaries of their underlying currencies. Therefore, globally allocated investments owned in US Dollars can lose money in a flat market if the Dollar declines. The Dollar peaked in early July and has since fallen by more than 6%. Therefore, if your US equity portfolio hasn’t gained more than 6% since July, you’ve actually lost money. The Governmental shut down has accelerated the recent slide and pushed the Dollar to a new 30 day low for the second time this week. This is only the second time since May of 2011 that we’ve made multiple 30-day lows in the same trading week.

Perhaps more troubling to global investors than the currency-based loss is the fact that the traditional safe haven investments, even in Dollar terms, have not behaved as expected. The primary relationship between the Dollar and the US equity markets since the financial implosion of 2008 has been negative. This has been embodied by Dollar rallies on stock market declines. Very simply, foreign capital gets converted to US Dollars and placed to work through buying declines in the stock market. Conversely, when foreign investors take profits in a rising stock market and convert back to their base currency, the Dollar falls.

We also see this relationship play out in the gold market. Economists on TV tell us to buy gold as a defense against a declining US Dollar. Sensationalists point to the overwhelming debt being created by our country and tell us to buy gold because our country is on the verge of implosion and our currency will become worthless. Speaking of correlations, it’s amazing how many of the people saying this are the ones selling gold investments. Astute investors would notice that the correlation between these two markets has been trending upwards since early June. This means they’re moving in the same direction more frequently rather than opposite each other as expected.

Foreign purchases of US goods have always been Dollar dependent. Every nation and agricultural enterprise within every nation is forced to tie their commodity purchases accordingly. Therefore, it becomes especially disturbing when a weaker Dollar fails to attract foreign purchases of global staples. Beginning in August of 2012 we started to see the commodity markets decouple from the US Dollar. Wheat was the first market to be sated. Corn followed suit in October of 2012 and hogs joined the new normal last November. This means that even base foreign needs have been filled. Therefore, they are more likely to trade in the same direction as the Dollar going forward rather than the typical negative correlation that we’ve seen from bargain hunters looking for inflation in the commodity markets.

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) stated that world Consumer Price Index (CPI) came in at 3.2% year over year for August. This is down from 4.9% a little over a year ago and ties in rather neatly with gold’s last run at $1,800 per ounce early last October. The US unemployment rate is generally believed to be artificially low in the as reported number of 7.3% and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) here in the US came in at a very tame 2.5%. These statistics, combined with a low global industrial capacity usage number suggest that inflation is nowhere near. Furthermore, the Federal Reserve Board’s recent decision not to implement a tapering of the $85 billion per month in economic stimulus reinforces the notion that their primary concern is deflation, rather than inflation.

Many economists believe that we may be near a tipping point in the bull run that has followed the economic meltdown of 2008. The obvious concern now lies in the protection of the wealth that’s been garnered during the recent run. Clearly, the ownership of alternative investments isn’t going to play out the way the pundits have suggested. Therefore, investment vehicles that will profit from a decline in both asset value and currency depreciation should be seriously considered. These include inverse ETF’s as well the futures markets, which will allow the seamless execution of short trades including currencies. Equity futures spreads selling small caps like the Russell 2000 and buying big caps like the S&P500 are also a good idea when expecting volatile, downward markets. Remember that cash is only king as long as the King’s throne isn’t sinking.

Supporting the Australian Dollar

The Australian Dollar has fallen around 11% over the last month. This is a very large and very rapid move for the currency of a major nation. How would you like to end up with 11% less in next week’s check? This is similar to what the average Australian will feel with every purchase of every imported good or service, just think of it as $4.50 gasoline and you’ll get an idea for the feel of it. Our outlook suggests that the change in the macro is correct but its initial impact has been over cooked.

The primary big picture changes that triggered this sell off are twofold. First, the slowing Chinese economy has been a primary destination for Australian raw materials. Secondly, the U.S. Federal Reserve Board announced its intentions to begin siphoning off the Quantitative Easing stimulus. This has triggered the unwinding of the carry trade.

China is Australia’s largest trading partner with total exports to China comprising more than 5% of Australia’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The impact of recent downward revisions to Chinese GDP has taken the wind out of the Australian economy.  The International Monetary Fund (IMF) cut their forecast for Chinese growth from 8% to 7.75% for 2013. HSBC and Barclays announced larger cuts in their projections and see Chinese growth at 7.4% rather than their previous estimates of 8.2% and 8.1% respectively for 2013. GDP forecast revisions of more than .5% tell us two things. First, economists aren’t great at forecasting when their margin of error is +/- 10% per quarter. Secondly, a .5% cut in Chinese GDP still leaves them in the enviable position of having the largest, strongest economy in the world.

The carry trade is based on borrowing cheap money from one country to buy assets in another country. The two primary components of a carry trade are the interest rate differential and the exchange rate between the two countries. The trade makes sense in a stable marketplace. Dollars borrowed in the United States at .25% are used to buy Australian treasuries yielding better than 3% and recently as high as 4.25%.  More importantly the Australian Dollar held its own throughout the global financial crisis. This made it a safe haven as the highly leveraged U.S. and Euro markets raced each other to the zero lower bound leaving Australia to benefit from both higher interest rates and currency appreciation. That’s a win/win in the carry trade.

The money that has poured into Australia can be seen in the rapid growth of their currency reserves. Foreign currencies were repatriated post haste during the financial crisis. Australia’s foreign exchange reserves declined from the all time high of more than $80 billion in May of 2007 down to $30 billion by January of 2008. Australia’s current reserves haven’t been this high since June of last year. June of 2012 also marks the low point for their currency in the last year.

The macro issues surrounding the global currency wars are beyond the scope of my day-to-day trading. However, the knee jerk response in the global currency wars due to Ben Bernanke’s suggestion that the Fed may begin to taper off the Quantitative Easing programs combined with the volatility in the Asian currencies and stock markets has created an overly bearish situation in the Australian Dollar. Their healthy balance sheet, excess foreign reserves and primary business of raw material and agricultural exports places them in a position to control the fortunes of their own currency, stock market and economy as a whole. They still have all the tools that we’ve already used to fight an economic downturn of their own. In fact, I’d say they’re holding a full clip while here in the U.S. we’re hoping we can pull back just long enough to reload. Therefore, the current prognosis lies in favor of a higher Australian Dollar going forward.

The commercial traders are well aware of the situation and they’ve been on a torrid buying spree in the Australian Dollar. In fact, they started buying in earnest once the Australian traded down to par (even money) with the U.S. Dollar, nearly doubling their net position over the last six weeks. We believe that the heavy commercial buying will cause the sell off to grind to a halt and protect us from much more downside risk. Therefore, we’ll be buying the Aussie as soon as we get some type of early technical reversal to trigger our long trade. We will then place a protective sell stop underneath the low for this move. Based on the current ranges and swings, we would expect to take profits between $.9750 and par to the U.S. Dollar.

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk of loss in investing in futures.

Commercial Support in the Canadian Dollar

The Commodity Futures Trading Commission releases its Commitment of Traders data weekly. This data tracks the amount of buying or selling in the commodity markets by the markets’ primary trader categories. I review this data every Sunday night when I begin compiling my trading plan for the coming week. The Canadian Dollar has hit my radar for each of the last three weeks as the commercial traders’ position has grown faster than at any time in the past and their total position has only been exceeded once in the history of the data set.

The Commitment of Traders data goes back to 1983 in the Canadian Dollar and the first meaningful blip on the radar shows up in February of 1986 when the Canadian Dollar bottomed around $.69 cents to the U.S. Dollar. Commercial traders went from neutral to net long more than 9,400 contracts, the equivalent of nearly $1 billion dollars at full contract value. The market rallied nearly 6% over the next three months. Commercial traders next set a record long position in March of 1990 at 10,270 contracts or, just over $1 billion at full contract value and the market rallied 5.5% in the next few months.

Commercial traders’ buying the futures doesn’t always lead directly to a rally. There are times when it simply slows the decline as they cover short positions, as well. There are considerable spikes in August of 1993 and January of 1995 when the Canadian Dollar had been on a steady decline since its $.90 cent peak in 1991. In fact, the commercial buying peaked at 28,000 contracts at the bottom of the market in January of 1995. In this case it’s important to remember the old rule, “Whether getting long or, covering shorts; buying is buying.” It would take another three years and the, “Asian contagion” to generate enough commercial interest to eclipse the buying peak at the 1995 trough.

The Canadian government has done an amazing job of revamping their monetary policies and budgets over the last 15 years. The primary impetus for this was the 1995 budget, which cut governmental spending across the board while allowing greater freedom to the individual provinces as to how they could spend the federal money they received. The provinces were then able to target the funds to their individual needs. Furthermore, the corporate tax and capital gains taxes were restructured to facilitate capital expenditures and new business generation. Finally, they implemented a federal General Services Tax. This is similar to the European Union VAT (Value Added Tax), which is a consumption tax that is paid proportionately by higher income people who spend more.

These changes significantly improved the Canadian economy. Their workforce has grown substantially. Unemployment has declined and jobs have been added to the economy. Welfare recipients declined along with the percentage of people below the poverty line. In fact, the number of low-income families declined by more than 30%. This was all achieved while cutting their debt to GDP ratio from 80% down to 45%. Their current debt to GDP has now reverted back around 85% due to the economic collapse. Meanwhile, our debt to GDP ratio has surpassed 100%. There is no question that our neighbors to the north are doing a far better job of maintaining their budget than we are.

The total net long record for commercial traders in the Canadian Dollar is 105,543 contracts. Commercial traders accumulated a net position of $10.5 billion dollars worth of Canadian Dollars in January of 2007 when the market was trading at $.85 cents to the U.S. Dollar. The Canadian Dollar then reached a record high of $1.10 by early November that same year. Equally important, these same commercial traders had pared this position down by more than 90% at the high water mark. That, my friends, is pretty darn good trading.

Currently, we have seen commercial traders’ positions increase from 4,431 contracts in mid January to more than 86,000 contracts, currently. The Canadian Dollar is currently trading around $.97 to the U.S. Dollar. This market has held above $.95 for the better part of the last three years. We view the strong commercial purchases as a sign of supporting the market at these levels. Commercial traders have demonstrated their forecasting ability admirably in the past and we will lean on them for support as we buy into this market. However, managing risk is always our number one concern. Therefore, we will place our protective stop under the current swing low of $.9650 in the June Canadian Dollar futures as we anticipate a move back to parity with our U.S. Dollar.

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk of loss in investing in futures.

Not Quite Time for Gold to Shine

The gold futures market is still looking for support since reaching a high near $1,800 per ounce in early October. The market had fallen by nearly $200 per ounce as recently as early this month. Fiscal cliff issues as well as tax and estate laws fueled some of the selling. However, commercial traders were the dominant sellers above $1,700 per ounce as they sold off their summer purchases made below $1,600. I believe the gold market has one more sell-off left in it before it can turn higher with any sustainability.

Comparatively speaking, gold held its own against the Dow in 2012 with both of them registering gains around 7% for the year. However, the more nimble companies of the S&P 500 and Nasdaq soundly trounced the returns of each, registering gains of 13% and 16%, respectively. The relative advantage of gold in uncertain times may be running its course. There currently is no inflation to worry about and CEO’s are learning how to increase productivity to compensate for increased legislative costs. Finally, the S&P has risen by about 19% over the last 10 years while gold has rallied by more than 250%. Therefore, sideways market action in gold over the last couple of years seems justified.

Meanwhile, seasonal and fundamental support for gold hasn’t provided much of a kick over the last two months. Typically, the Indian wedding season creates a big source of physical demand in the gold market from late September through the New Year. In fact, the strongest seasonal period for gold is from late August through October in anticipation of this season. This effect should be gaining strength due to the rise of the middle and upper middle classes in India yet, the market seemed to absorb this support with nary a rally to be had. I think we’ll see the market’s second strongest period, which begins now, and runs through the first week of February provide us with a tradable bottom and rally point.

Finally, the last of the short-term negatives is the strength of the U.S. Dollar. The U.S. Dollar trades opposite the gold market. Gold falls when the Dollar rallies because the stronger Dollar buys more, “stuff” on the open market and while we’ve talked about commercial traders buying gold, they’ve also been buying the U.S. Dollar Index. Commercial traders have fully supported the Dollar Index at the 79.00 level. The Dollar Index traded to a low of 79.01 on December 19th followed by a recent test of that low down to 79.40. The re-test of the 79.00 low has created a bullish divergence in technical indicators suggesting that this low may be the bottom and could lead to a run back to the top of its trading range around 81.50. This can also be confirmed in the Euro Currency and the Japanese Yen. The Euro currency futures market has seen commercial traders sell more than 120,000 contracts in the last six weeks as the market has rallied from 1.29 to 1.34 per Dollar. Meanwhile Japan’s new Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, has turned the country’s monetary presses up to 11 in an attempt to jump-start their domestic economy.

The absence of an expected rally in the gold market through the last few weeks leads me to believe that the internals simply don’t support these price levels, yet. Therefore, the market will continue to seek a price low enough to attract new buyers beyond the commercial traders’ value area. Typically, this would lead to a washout of some sort that may force the gold market to test its 2012 lows around $1,540 per ounce before finding a bottom.

Furthermore, the flush in gold would most likely be accompanied by a rally in the U.S. Dollar and could push it back above the previously mentioned 81.50 level. Proper negotiation and resolution of the pending debt ceiling would most likely exacerbate both of these scenarios while also including a large stock market rally. Conversely, a legislative fiasco would lead to a Dollar washout, as the global economies would lose faith in our ability to manage ourselves and treat our markets accordingly. Therefore, in spite of the inter-market, fundamental and technical analyses we will keep our protective stops close on our long Dollar position while waiting for an opportunity to buy gold at discount prices for the long haul.

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk of loss in investing in futures.