Tag Archives: euro

Weekly Commodity Strategy Review

We focused on two main themes this week. First, we looked at selling the Euro currency for TraderPlanet and followed it right up with a look at the Dollar Index on Tuesday for Equities.com. Meanwhile, our main piece focused on the grain markets ahead of Tuesday’s USDA Acreage Report.

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Weekly Commodity Strategy Review

We began this week by revisiting the sugar futures market. We started talking about it a couple of weeks ago for Equities.com in, “Time to Sweeten on Sugar.” We updated this outlook Monday for TraderPlanet.com. This trade finally triggered on Thursday and currently sits above the $.1310 level that we believe will induce some speculative short covering. See, “Sugar Prices on the Decline.”

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Still Decoupling The Euro and Swiss Franc

The Euro currency and Swiss Franc had been artificially tied together since 2011. Eventually, as with all single markets tying themselves to a larger commonwealth, the single market eventually needs out. It can happen for a variety of reasons either the larger group’s or the individual country’s but eventually, the fluid movement of a single country’s needs will find itself at odds with the larger group’s stagnancy.

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Weekly Commodity Strategy Review

This morning’s unrevised Q4 GDP number at 2.2% on declining corporate profits provides just the right ambiance for a what has been a gloomy week. While we had a completely separate trade looking at multi-year lows in , “Time to Sweeten on Sugar,” most of our focus was on the financial markets.

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Global Uncertainty Strengthens Dollar

Five years ago the financial world was coming to an end. The stock market tanked and interest rates went negative due to the unsurpassed flight to safety in U.S. Treasuries. Most of this was due to greedy lending practices that claimed to be championing President Clinton’s thesis that everyone in America should be able to own a home. Lax lending requirements that were intended to get lower income earners into their own homes travelled up market and allowed upper middle and upper tier earners to refinance their houses at artificially low rates to buy second homes and Harley’s. Once again, misguided bureaucratic endeavors have been perverted by greed. The roaches in China are beginning to surface and the banking system stress tests in Europe are uncovering the depth of this five-year-old issue and once again, the primary beneficiary of these actions will be the U.S. Dollar.

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Trading’s Gut Check

Actively participating in the markets comes with the understanding that the trader’s gut will be checked frequently and deeply. The primary cause of this is the trader’s degree of certainty in an uncertain world. It’s been proven over and over again that once an individual feels that they have enough information to make a decision, they will. Additional information provided after the fact typically raises the degree of certainty that the correct decision was made, rather than raising the degree of accuracy. So, I sit in front of the Federal Reserve Board’s announcement this afternoon involved up to my eyeballs in the US Dollar, Euro currency, 10-year Treasury Notes and the Russell 2000 stock index.

Each one of these positions is the result of mechanical trading programs that I’ve developed, tested and traded. Therefore, there are no arbitrary decisions or adjustments to be made. This leaves me in front of the screens sitting on pins and needles waiting for a range of possibilities to materialize. Given my experience with the markets, I expect the outcome to be somewhere in the middle. Rarely does it turn out one sided either positively or, negatively.

Let’s review the possible outcomes and the gut wrenching turmoil that comes with sitting on several large positions as I try to close out the books for 2013. My oldest position on the books is short the Euro FX. I stand to profit if the Euro currency weakens against the US Dollar. I’m short the market near the top of its range based on my research into the Commitment of Traders Reports. I know that there’s about a 60% chance the Euro will back off these highs by about a penny and a half. However, the market’s continuing consolidation near these highs puts me in a position where I could be stopped out of the market with a loss even before the Fed announces its decision this afternoon. The market’s proximity to my stop loss order contributes greatly to my angst.

The opposing position to the Euro is my long US Dollar Index position. Again, I’m long the US Dollar Index against a basket of currencies, which is dominated by the Euro. If the Fed suggests that they will begin to taper quickly, the Dollar should rally. Pulling stimulus out of the economy will place fewer Dollars in future circulation thus, increasing the value of the Dollars already in the market. The Dollar would rally and the Euro would fall. Both of my currency positions would be profitable.

Tapering by the Fed would most likely crush my 10-year Note position. Frankly, the discretionary trader in me can create the strongest case for owning 10-year Notes and betting against taper talk. Based on my analysis of the commercial traders in the 10-year Note I fully expect any decline in Treasury prices to be short lived. Commercial traders have accumulated their largest net long position in the 10-year Note since April of 2005. Commercial traders have dominated the big moves in the Treasuries with uncanny accuracy. If they’re right about no taper talk this afternoon, Treasuries will rally substantially and I’ll profit from my position….while losing on my currency trades.

This leads to my final position. I use a pretty fancy program for developing my day trading systems. Whereas my swing-trading program is based on the fundamental data inferred from the collective positions of the markets’ participants, my day trading programs are strictly technical. Knowing that the markets will unfailingly put a man to the test, it should come as no surprise that my day trading programs now have me long two units of the Russell 2000 stock index heading into this afternoon’s announcement. Furthermore, while I have some expectations of how the currencies and Treasuries will react to the Fed’s decision, the stock market’s reaction is far less predictable. If the Fed tapers, the stock market may rally further based on the assumption of a strong economy leading to further gains. However, the collective reaction could very well be violently lower as tapering could signal the end of the free money that many believe has fueled the rally to this point.

Discretionary traders face conflicting data like this all of the time and pick and choose which markets they’re in and when they’re in them. Systematic traders follow the signals generated by their programs without question. The cruelest aspect of trading is the market’s uncanny ability to seek out a traders’ weak spot and twist agony’s knife. I’ve been actively trading for more than 20 years and the trepidation of a pending report never goes away. This is where the classic line, “Plan your trade. Trade your plan” has the most value. Remember, additional information acquired after the fact doesn’t increase the odds of being right, it simply tricks the mind into greater certainty of the existing thought pattern.

Supporting the Australian Dollar

The Australian Dollar has fallen around 11% over the last month. This is a very large and very rapid move for the currency of a major nation. How would you like to end up with 11% less in next week’s check? This is similar to what the average Australian will feel with every purchase of every imported good or service, just think of it as $4.50 gasoline and you’ll get an idea for the feel of it. Our outlook suggests that the change in the macro is correct but its initial impact has been over cooked.

The primary big picture changes that triggered this sell off are twofold. First, the slowing Chinese economy has been a primary destination for Australian raw materials. Secondly, the U.S. Federal Reserve Board announced its intentions to begin siphoning off the Quantitative Easing stimulus. This has triggered the unwinding of the carry trade.

China is Australia’s largest trading partner with total exports to China comprising more than 5% of Australia’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The impact of recent downward revisions to Chinese GDP has taken the wind out of the Australian economy.  The International Monetary Fund (IMF) cut their forecast for Chinese growth from 8% to 7.75% for 2013. HSBC and Barclays announced larger cuts in their projections and see Chinese growth at 7.4% rather than their previous estimates of 8.2% and 8.1% respectively for 2013. GDP forecast revisions of more than .5% tell us two things. First, economists aren’t great at forecasting when their margin of error is +/- 10% per quarter. Secondly, a .5% cut in Chinese GDP still leaves them in the enviable position of having the largest, strongest economy in the world.

The carry trade is based on borrowing cheap money from one country to buy assets in another country. The two primary components of a carry trade are the interest rate differential and the exchange rate between the two countries. The trade makes sense in a stable marketplace. Dollars borrowed in the United States at .25% are used to buy Australian treasuries yielding better than 3% and recently as high as 4.25%.  More importantly the Australian Dollar held its own throughout the global financial crisis. This made it a safe haven as the highly leveraged U.S. and Euro markets raced each other to the zero lower bound leaving Australia to benefit from both higher interest rates and currency appreciation. That’s a win/win in the carry trade.

The money that has poured into Australia can be seen in the rapid growth of their currency reserves. Foreign currencies were repatriated post haste during the financial crisis. Australia’s foreign exchange reserves declined from the all time high of more than $80 billion in May of 2007 down to $30 billion by January of 2008. Australia’s current reserves haven’t been this high since June of last year. June of 2012 also marks the low point for their currency in the last year.

The macro issues surrounding the global currency wars are beyond the scope of my day-to-day trading. However, the knee jerk response in the global currency wars due to Ben Bernanke’s suggestion that the Fed may begin to taper off the Quantitative Easing programs combined with the volatility in the Asian currencies and stock markets has created an overly bearish situation in the Australian Dollar. Their healthy balance sheet, excess foreign reserves and primary business of raw material and agricultural exports places them in a position to control the fortunes of their own currency, stock market and economy as a whole. They still have all the tools that we’ve already used to fight an economic downturn of their own. In fact, I’d say they’re holding a full clip while here in the U.S. we’re hoping we can pull back just long enough to reload. Therefore, the current prognosis lies in favor of a higher Australian Dollar going forward.

The commercial traders are well aware of the situation and they’ve been on a torrid buying spree in the Australian Dollar. In fact, they started buying in earnest once the Australian traded down to par (even money) with the U.S. Dollar, nearly doubling their net position over the last six weeks. We believe that the heavy commercial buying will cause the sell off to grind to a halt and protect us from much more downside risk. Therefore, we’ll be buying the Aussie as soon as we get some type of early technical reversal to trigger our long trade. We will then place a protective sell stop underneath the low for this move. Based on the current ranges and swings, we would expect to take profits between $.9750 and par to the U.S. Dollar.

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk of loss in investing in futures.

Not Quite Time for Gold to Shine

The gold futures market is still looking for support since reaching a high near $1,800 per ounce in early October. The market had fallen by nearly $200 per ounce as recently as early this month. Fiscal cliff issues as well as tax and estate laws fueled some of the selling. However, commercial traders were the dominant sellers above $1,700 per ounce as they sold off their summer purchases made below $1,600. I believe the gold market has one more sell-off left in it before it can turn higher with any sustainability.

Comparatively speaking, gold held its own against the Dow in 2012 with both of them registering gains around 7% for the year. However, the more nimble companies of the S&P 500 and Nasdaq soundly trounced the returns of each, registering gains of 13% and 16%, respectively. The relative advantage of gold in uncertain times may be running its course. There currently is no inflation to worry about and CEO’s are learning how to increase productivity to compensate for increased legislative costs. Finally, the S&P has risen by about 19% over the last 10 years while gold has rallied by more than 250%. Therefore, sideways market action in gold over the last couple of years seems justified.

Meanwhile, seasonal and fundamental support for gold hasn’t provided much of a kick over the last two months. Typically, the Indian wedding season creates a big source of physical demand in the gold market from late September through the New Year. In fact, the strongest seasonal period for gold is from late August through October in anticipation of this season. This effect should be gaining strength due to the rise of the middle and upper middle classes in India yet, the market seemed to absorb this support with nary a rally to be had. I think we’ll see the market’s second strongest period, which begins now, and runs through the first week of February provide us with a tradable bottom and rally point.

Finally, the last of the short-term negatives is the strength of the U.S. Dollar. The U.S. Dollar trades opposite the gold market. Gold falls when the Dollar rallies because the stronger Dollar buys more, “stuff” on the open market and while we’ve talked about commercial traders buying gold, they’ve also been buying the U.S. Dollar Index. Commercial traders have fully supported the Dollar Index at the 79.00 level. The Dollar Index traded to a low of 79.01 on December 19th followed by a recent test of that low down to 79.40. The re-test of the 79.00 low has created a bullish divergence in technical indicators suggesting that this low may be the bottom and could lead to a run back to the top of its trading range around 81.50. This can also be confirmed in the Euro Currency and the Japanese Yen. The Euro currency futures market has seen commercial traders sell more than 120,000 contracts in the last six weeks as the market has rallied from 1.29 to 1.34 per Dollar. Meanwhile Japan’s new Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, has turned the country’s monetary presses up to 11 in an attempt to jump-start their domestic economy.

The absence of an expected rally in the gold market through the last few weeks leads me to believe that the internals simply don’t support these price levels, yet. Therefore, the market will continue to seek a price low enough to attract new buyers beyond the commercial traders’ value area. Typically, this would lead to a washout of some sort that may force the gold market to test its 2012 lows around $1,540 per ounce before finding a bottom.

Furthermore, the flush in gold would most likely be accompanied by a rally in the U.S. Dollar and could push it back above the previously mentioned 81.50 level. Proper negotiation and resolution of the pending debt ceiling would most likely exacerbate both of these scenarios while also including a large stock market rally. Conversely, a legislative fiasco would lead to a Dollar washout, as the global economies would lose faith in our ability to manage ourselves and treat our markets accordingly. Therefore, in spite of the inter-market, fundamental and technical analyses we will keep our protective stops close on our long Dollar position while waiting for an opportunity to buy gold at discount prices for the long haul.

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk of loss in investing in futures.

The Stock Market Bounce is for Real

We published a sell signal for the S&P 500 in our October 4th article, “Who is Pushing the Stock Market.” Several fundamental and technical reasons were laid out. The fact that the market topped out the very next day and sold off by 9% in the last month leads me to believe that this decline may have run its course. The easy money on the sell side has been made and perhaps, we should start looking at the buy side of the market.

Separating the, “what happened” from the “why did it happen” is always tough. Throwing political variables like the election and the Euro crisis into the mix along with individual accommodations for the fiscal cliff and estate planning leaves us with very real macro and micro implications currently in play. We’ll take a brief look at these and see why the odds may be stacking up in favor of the buy side of the market.

The markets clearly viewed the election results in a negative light by selling off 6.3% in eight trading sessions. I think the markets were fully prepared for an Obama victory prior to the debates however Romney’s debate performance was just enough to make it a bit of a race. Therefore, investors chose to hold on through the election just in case Mitt pulled it off. Had Mitt won, we wouldn’t have seen the selling pressure. Obama’s victory guarantees higher taxes going forward. Therefore, many people are rebalancing their portfolios to take advantage of the tax laws as they stand in 2012. That answers some of the, “why” for the decline.

Commercial traders greeted the sell off in the markets with open arms. Traders in the Nasdaq and Dow Jones were major buyers, doubling their net long position in the Nasdaq and increasing their position in the Dow Jones by more than 50%. The major surge in commercial buying has pushed momentum back in favor of the bulls. Furthermore, combining the recent sell off with commercial trader buying has provided us with a Commitment of Traders buy signal. This is the methodology I presented at the World Traders Expo in Chicago last month.

Further bullish indicators focus on the extremely bearish sentiment of the trading public. Without getting into too much detail, many of the indicators that measure investor sentiment are exceptionally bearish. These readings typically mean the opposite is about to happen because the investing public typically does the exact opposite of what they should do. This one of the primary reasons we follow the commercial traders, rather than the small speculators.

Technically speaking, there are two key points. First of all, the sell off pushed us to a new three month low. Secondly, the about face reversal the market pulled provided indication of a major rejection of that low. The rally on the 19th was so strong that 90% of roughly 2,800 stocks traded on the NYSE closed higher. That kind of rally provides a statistically valid bottoming signal. Merrill Lynch was the first to capitalize on the statistical relevance stating that since 2006 there have been 1,733 trading days and this type of day has been observed only 62 times. The relevant pattern is that we should pause for a couple of days before resuming our climb through the 10, 20, 30 and 65 day moving averages which come in at 1372, 1388, 1404 and 1417 respectively.

One last piece of evidence of the rejection of the new three-month low made on the 16th is that the market immediately opened .5% higher and continued to climb another 1.5% for the day. The strong rally off the multi month low has only occurred 9 times since the Daily Sentiment Report has been tracking this and their research shows 7 of the 9 led to multi week bull runs. The two that didn’t pan out were both in the months following the tragic events of September 11th.

The sell off that we anticipated came to fruition however, I believe it’s much harder to turn around and buy the market when the media is so full of naysayers. To them, I would concede that not coming to an agreement on the fiscal cliff would send the stock market much lower. However, I believe that they will reach some type of settlement. The market will gyrate according to the most recent piece of news but ultimately it will climb higher. Finally, we cannot let sentiment overrule quantitative analysis. To ignore the facts would be choosing to live in ignorance.

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk of loss in investing in futures.