Tag Archives: dow

Using the Commitment of Traders Report to Trade the Stock Indices

This has been a tumultuous week in the equity markets as news events and political leveraging have sent markets in China and Greece down by more than 5% and 11%, respectively. Here in the US,  Wednesday’s action attempted to mimic the global markets but was met by a solid bid in the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Index around the Thanksgiving lows. Meanwhile, the Russell 2000 found support near the critical 1150 level that has propped it up since late October. We published a short take in Equities.com earlier in the week projecting expected weakness in the equity markets due to the shift in the commercial traders’ position over the last couple of weeks. This has led many to ask exactly how we use these reports to forecast trading opportunities in the commodity markets. We’ll use this week’s piece to explain our approach in detail within the context of today’s equity markets.

We frequently describe the discretionary portion of our COT Signals advisory service as a three step process. First of all, we only trade in line with the momentum of the commercial traders. It has long been our belief, three generations worth, that no one knows the commodity markets like those who whose livelihood’s rest upon the proper forecasting of their respective market. This includes the actual commodity producers like farmers, miners and drillers along with the professional equity portfolio managers using the stock index futures to hedge and leverage their cash portfolios. Tracking the commercial traders’ net position provides quantitative evidence of both the long and short hedgers’ actions within an individual market. The importance of their net position lies in the collective wisdom of this trading group. Their combined access to the best information and models is summed up by their collective actions. The final part of the commercial equation lies in tracking the momentum of their position. Their eagerness to buy or, sell at a given price level is equally important as the net position. We only trade in the direction of commercial momentum. Finally, commercial trader momentum is the bottom indicator on the chart below.

Commercial traders have positioned themselves on the right side of the market for every major move this year.
Commercial traders have positioned themselves on the right side of the market for every major move this year.

The second step of this process is how we translate the weekly commitment of traders data into a day by day trading method. Commercial traders have two primary advantages over the retail trader. First of all, they have much deeper pockets and they have the ability to make or, take delivery of the underlying commodity as needed. Secondly, they have a much longer time horizon. Think, entire growing season or their fiscal year on a quarter by quarter basis. Therefore, we have to find a way to minimize risk and preserve our capital. We do this by using a proprietary short-term momentum indicator on daily data. The setup involves finding markets that are momentarily at odds with the commercial traders’ momentum. If commercial momentum is bearish, we are waiting for our indicator to return a short-term overbought situation. Conversely, if commercial traders are bullish, we wait for a market to become oversold in the short-term. The short-term momentum indicator is labeled in the second graph.

Once we have a short-term overbought or, oversold condition opposite of commercial momentum, an active setup is created. The trigger is pulled when the short-term market momentum indicator moves back across the overbought/oversold threshold. Waiting for the reversal provides two key elements to successful trading. First of all, it keeps us out of runaway markets. Markets are prone to fits of irrationality that catch even the most seasoned of commercial traders off guard. News events, weather issues and government reports can all wreak havoc unexpectedly. Waiting for the reversal also provides us with the swing high or low that is necessary to determine the protective stop point that will be used to protect the position. Everywhere there is a circle, red or blue, was a trading opportunity in the S&P 500 this year. Within each circle, the highest or lowest value was the protective stop point. It is imperative to know the protective stop prior to placing any trade. This allows the trader to determine the proper number of contracts to trade relative to their portfolio equity. Risk is always the number on concern of successful trading. Currently, the protective stop levels are 17980 in the Dow, 1189 in the Russell 2000 and 2079 in the S&P 500.

Currently, the Dow, S&P 500 and Russell 2000 all contain this same set of circumstances. Given the lofty valuations, the speed of the recent rally and recent global economic developments it seems prudent to expect a retreat from these highs. Clearly, that is what the commercial traders, who were MAJOR buyers at the October lows believe is about to happen. We’ll heed their collective wisdom as they’ve successfully called every major move in the stock market for 2014.

 

 

 

Commercial Traders Own the Stock Market’s Gyrations

The stock market doesn’t seem to know whether good news is good or bad news is good. The equity markets have sold off between 4 and 6 percent since we published this key reversal in early March with the small cap Russell 2000 and Nasdaq 100 tech stocks peaking a month before the big Dow and S&P stocks rolled over. April’s unemployment report supplied the catalyst for the Dow and S&P sell off but again the question becomes, “is bad news still good for business friendly easy monetary policies or, does good news mean we’re finally back on track?” Based on a number of factors, it appears the answer is somewhere in the middle. The Goldilocks equity market likes its data neither too hot nor, too cold.

Continue reading Commercial Traders Own the Stock Market’s Gyrations

The Fed is Cornering Itself

The government shutdown has passed and the markets are still here. The stopgap measures that kicked the can into early next year merely provided a buying opportunity in the interest rate sector for the top 1% while providing the catalyst for the final leg up in a bubble that makes the housing issue of ’07 look like an appetizer. Recent reports suggest that two separate papers presented at the International Monetary Fund meeting this week highlight the potential for a serious revision and extension of the fiscal stimulus plans already in place. Given the current nature of our markets, it’s hard to see how this doesn’t turn sour in the long run.

The Federal Reserve Board has two primary objectives; fostering full employment and stabilizing market prices. Historically, market prices referred to those things in life, which affect all of us like, milk, gasoline and farmland. This perspective has increasingly shifted towards the stabilization of more esoteric prices like the stock markets and interest rates. This shift in focus was originally designed to prop up a swooning stock market as well as getting capital flowing again during the heart of the economic collapse of ’08. The markets came roaring back with equities more than doubling and reaching all time highs this year and interest rates have bumped along at historic lows ever since.

The Fed achieved their goal of stabilizing prices ages ago and it has been proven that each additional increase in Quantitative Easing has been exponentially less effective than the previous one. This path will be followed for the next four years as Janet Yellen is handed the reins of the Fed next year. Why would the smartest minds ignore the data that so clearly illustrates these points? The simple answer is that, “and in other news, the Dow Jones Industrial Average reached another new high today,” sounds like a win to the average John Doe. The truth is that the average John Doe has never participated less in a stock market rally. Furthermore, the headline unemployment rate of 7.2% does not take into account that the labor participation rate is at a 35 year low. Therefore, the unemployment rate as published fails to include 90 million Americans who’ve simply given up looking for work and are drawing no unemployment assistance, thus no longer counting as unemployed.

Recent talk of tapering off the $85 billion per month Fed bond buying programs spooked the equity markets and sent the bond market plummeting, and rightly so. There’s no question that the excess capital created by the Fed must end up somewhere. We’ve seen a full rotation out of stocks and interest rates and into commodities and gold. Now, it’s out of commodities and back into interest rates and equities. The government shutdown created the mother of all buying opportunities in the interest rate sector. You can see the commercial trader buying surge as the Fed’s suggestion in May scared the market. I believe this could lead to the final phase of an interest rate bubble that dwarfs the housing bubble because the big money knows the Fed is too scared to take their foot off of the accelerator and has backed themselves into a corner due to their willingness to manipulate prices on the open market.

We’ve already seen some of the smartest bond money in the world step aside with Bill Gross of Pimco choosing to exit the 30-year bond bull. However, like most smart money, he’s probably early on the way out and will probably miss the last leg up. Although, he was recently quoted about buying the bottom of the shutdown that it was like, “picking up pennies on the street. Somehow, I think he’ll survive. His pennies are not the same as my copper pennies. Banking analyst Dick Bove said on CNBC that the US balance sheet shows us at $16 TRILLION in the hole. Most of this is coming due between 2018 and 2020 as the Fed has taken advantage of lower yields across the board to increase the average length of maturity from 4.1 to 5.4 years since 2009.

Finally, the two papers presented this week will suggest that we EXTEND the length of the QE programs from the original goal of 6.5% unemployment and 2.5% inflation to perhaps 6% or even 5.5% unemployment as inflation is yet to rear its head. The Fed has increased its monetary base from less than $1 trillion prior to the economic implosion to more than $3.6 trillion. If the economic stimulus is the cause of the decline in unemployment from 10% to 7.2%, not counting a quarter of the US population who’ve quit looking for work, then a linear equation suggests that another $1 trillion would get us to 6% unemployment.

Current bond market expectations suggest the 10-year Treasury Note may close the year near 2.25%. That’s approximately 60 basis points above our current price of 126^27. The market would have to reach a new all time high of 133^13 for yields to decline this far. This represents a $6,500 rally per contract in the 10-year Note futures. Given the nature of the bond market, I expect to be able to get this market bought around the 125^00 level and would risk the trade to the 16-day government shutdown low around 122^00. This would provide a risk to reward of $3,000 to $8,400. While we fully intend to trade the bond rally, our primary concern remains focused on what happens once it’s over. The big question remains, “How can the Fed weasel its way out of a situation that they created for themselves while continuing to suggest not only its continuation but, its continuation beyond the original scope of its design?”

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What’s Wrong with Equities

The economic black hole between the equity markets and the man on the street has never been greater. Earlier this month the media trumpeted about the all time highs in the Dow Jones Industrial Average. The President commends Congress for creating policies that “put Americans back to work,” and points to unemployment levels that are 25% below their 2009 peak. Meanwhile NBC News publishes the results of a new study, which states that four out of five of us will, “struggle with joblessness, near-poverty or reliance on welfare for at least parts of their lives.” Please bear with the following few paragraphs as we discuss the social issues that we all feel and use some correlational analysis to come up with a trading plan.

Anecdotal evidence of the government’s failed economic bailout plans to help the working class and small businesses abounds. Finally, we have some research that quantifies where TARP funds went as well as how much of the stimulus reached its intended target. We suggested five years ago that the major banks who were deemed, “too big to fail” were more likely to sit on the funds they received in order to shore up their own loan to equity ratios than they were to make those same funds that had been ear marked for small business creation and maintenance available to them.

The best summation of these events comes from John Mauldin, a republican economist from Texas. “We are watching the Fed employ a trickle-down monetary policy. They hope that if they pump up the banks and stock market, increased wealth will lead to more investment and higher consumption, which will in turn translate into more jobs and higher incomes as the stimulus trickles down the economic ladder. The kindred policy of trickle-down economics was thoroughly trashed by the same people who now support a trickle-down monetary policy and quantitative easing. It is not working.” Mauldin’s condemnation of trickle down economics is especially telling given his own personal background.

The government bailed out the owners of the large banks and their related business entities. Warren Buffet’s Berkshire Hathaway is a good example. When the financial crisis set in Mr. Buffet, who already owned a considerable position in Goldman Sachs, doubled down as the stock hit the skids. He was betting that the Goldman was, “too big to fail” and that the government would bail them out, which they did. Goldman Sachs received $10 billion in TARP aid. Berkshire Hathaway stock is 10% higher now than before the collapse and is up approximately 30% this year. The point is that those with equity ownership and the resources to increase their equity ownership by using the Federal Reserve as a backstop profited handsomely. Unfortunately, a Gallup poll shows that the percentage of Americans owning individual stocks and securities is at its lowest level since 1999 and has declined by 13% since 2007.

Human nature is a terrible trader. The scarcer something becomes, the more we want it. The more that’s available, the less we want it. When stocks were cheap, we were scared. We as individuals are never, “too big to fail.” Collectively, we rarely succeed. This is evidenced by the recent run up in margin buying, which just hit a new all time high. Margin buying is akin to buying stocks on leverage. Currently, investors are only required to put up 50% of the face value of a stock and the brokerage house, “loans” you the balance. The last recent highs were 2000 and 2007. Ring any bells? This is a significant indication that individual investors are doubling up at the top to catch what’s left of the rally they’ve missed. Conversely, When the Federal Reserve Board announced a possibility of easing back on the stimulus and bonds tanked, these were the same people pulling their money out. This is a clear, ugly and leveraged speculative rotation.

The markets themselves tell a different story. The Fed can’t afford to let off the stimulus gas just yet and the major market players know it. They also see the sucker top forming in the equity markets. The appropriate strategy we see is to tighten up equity risk and look towards the long end of the yield curve to regain some of its losses. Frankly, we think moving from equities to bonds should be the primary move between now and October. Take advantage of the access to information we now have and know that ignorance is a choice.This material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of Commodity & Derivative Advisors and is, or is in the nature of, a solicitation. This material is not a research report prepared by Commodity & Derivative Advisors’ Research Department. By accepting this communication, you agree that you are an experienced user of the futures markets, capable of making independent trading decisions, and agree that you are not, and will not, rely solely on this communication in making trading decisions.

The risk of loss in trading futures and/or options is substantial and each investor and/or trader must consider whether this is a suitable investment. Past performance, whether actual or indicated by simulated historical tests of strategies, is not indicative of future results. Trading advice is based on information taken from trades and statistical services and other sources thatCommodity & Derivative Advisors believes are reliable.  We do not guarantee that such information is accurate or complete and it should not be relied upon as such. Trading advice reflects our good faith judgment at a specific time and is subject to change without notice. There is no guarantee that the advice we give will result in profitable trades.

Spread Trading the Russell 2000 Vs. S&P 500

The stock market has made a lot of noise this week with the Dow Jones Industrial Average climbing above 15,000 for the first time in history. In fact, all of the major averages are up about 18% year to date. There is a general consensus that the massive liquidity operations the Federal Reserve board has implemented are the primary contributor to the market’s rally. However, there are several competing theories as to where the top may be. This week, we’re going to take a look at seasonal tops in the Russell 2000 small cap stock index compared to the S&P 500 large cap index to try and lock in some profits while minimizing downside risk.

The Russell 2000 is a stock index made up of small companies with a median market capitalization value of around half a billion dollars. This compares to the S&P 500 market capitalization average of nearly 28 billion dollars. Another way of putting this in perspective is that the Russell 2000’s largest company by market cap is Alaska Air as compared to the S&P 500’s largest company, Apple. The important thing here is to differentiate the small cap growth stocks of the Russell 2000 from the large caps that make up the S&P 500.

The reason for this is that small caps and large caps tend to behave differently. Small caps tend to lead. Therefore, they overshoot the tops and the bottoms. The smaller nature of the stocks in the Russell 2000 means that it takes less money to move the underlying stock. Small companies are also easier to grow. Of course, extra growth comes with extra risk. The composition of the Russell 2000 changes regularly due to new companies being added while others are removed. The large cap indexes like the S&P 500 are more stable due to the massive size of the companies it’s comprised of. Steady, stable, predictable growth is what is hoped for in the S&P 500.

We’ve all heard the old adage, “Sell in May and walk away.” There is a bit of truth to this as the primary stock market gauges are typically flat through the summer with a bit of upside bias and lots of downside volatility. In fact, this seasonality is even more pronounced in the Russell 2000, which tends to bottom in August. In other words, growth is minimal while full risk exposure remains. This is not an ideal risk to reward scenario. Over the last ten years, the Russell 2000 has called the late spring / early summer top correctly eight times. The two years it was wrong were 2008 and 2009 when the markets had already been beaten down. The average profit on the trade I’m about to detail was $4,250 for the other eight years.

There are two different ways to lay this trade out. The complicated way would be to find the least common multiple of the underlying futures contracts and work out the rest of the equation as percentages and then translate the percentages back into dollars and cents. Fortunately, we can simply use the futures contracts as they are and buy an S&P 500 futures contract while simultaneously selling a Russell 2000 futures contract.

This application takes advantage of the Russell 2000’s larger built in multiplier. Calculating the value of the Russell 2000 futures contract is as simple as multiplying the index by its $100 multiplier. Thus, a June mini-Russell 2000 contract trading at 970.00 has a cash value of 970.00 X $100 = $97,000. Meanwhile, the mini-S&P 500 has a built in $50 multiplier. Therefore, the mini-S&P 500 futures contract has a cash value of 1625.00 X $50 = $81,250. Buying one mini-S&P 500 futures contract and selling one mini-Russell 2000 creates a net short cash value of  $15,750 worth of small cap stocks.

The maximum value for this spread position was $16,671 in May of 2011. This represents the farthest the Russell 2000 futures have climbed above the S&P 500. We recently made a high of $16,200 two weeks ago.  Currently, this spread is trading at $15,350. I expect the recent April high to hold. If the market trades above the recent high of  $16,200, I will exit the trade at a loss. Recently, the average price for this spread is around $11,500. Therefore, I will use this support as the first place to look for profits. This sets up a trade that is slightly short the stock market through exploiting seasonal and market capitalization biases. Furthermore, this trade has had a relatively high historical winning percentage and is currently providing us with a 4-1 risk to reward ratio.

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk of loss in investing in futures.

Bad Year to be Responsibly Average

The Dow Jones has recovered all of its losses since the financial crisis and made a new all time high this week. Unfortunately, most of you reading this will have benefitted very little from its dramatic comeback. However, there are a very few who have benefitted greatly. Professor G. William Domhoff of the University of California demonstrated that the richest 10% own 98.5% of all financial securities. Furthermore the wealth gap between the top 20% and the rest of the population has never been larger. Finally, the growth in income disparity has accelerated under President Obama.

Matt Stoller, of the Roosevelt Institute analyzed IRS data to determine who captured the lion’s share of real average income growth between 1993 and 2010 and found that under President Bush, the top one percent captured 65% of the real average income growth while under President Obama, the top 1% has captured 93% of the real average income growth. The point here is not to choose political sides; after all, income was most evenly distributed under President Clinton. The point is that regardless of what side the politicians are on or whom they pretend to be looking out for, their number one concern is lining the pockets of those that paid for their election. Left or right is irrelevant.

The political system repays two types of voters. It enacts legislation at the highest levels to foster growth in the pharmaceutical, military, raw material and financial industries, thus repaying their campaign contributors. Secondly, the popular vote is increasingly purchased through extended government subsidies on everything from an extension of unemployment benefits and disability claims to housing subsidies and mortgage forgiveness. Every additional dollar doled out through legislation or direct voucher subsidy is a dollar paid to ensure the perpetuation of a system that is withdrawing cash from the middle of our economy and redistributing it between the massive and growing welfare class and the elitist top 10%.

This not intended to slam the unemployed. Frankly, the numbers reported for unemployment like the current measure of 7.9% is woefully under reported when compared to what real unemployment feels like. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that there are 8 million people who are unsatisfied workers. These are people who can’t find enough work. They also report that there are another 10 million workers who have given up looking for work. When these 18 million dissatisfied and exasperated workers are added back into the working population a truer picture of unemployment approaches 14.5%. Finally, these numbers don’t reflect another 5 million people who gave up looking for work and are now drawing social security disability.

While many of us haven’t participated in the stock market rally I think one place we’ve shared the climb is at the gas pump. The price of gas has risen steadily over the last month and the Energy Information Administration says that 2012 was nearly the most expensive year on record for American drivers, second only to 2008. They said gas prices accounted for 5.8% of a $50,000 median income. This year’s price increases could push this to nearly 18% of median income and drag another $400 out of the middle’s pockets.

High gas prices stink but at least they’re not the triple economic threat of the Affordable Health Care Act, which will reduce total hiring and hours worked as employers attempt to remain below the hourly and total employment thresholds. The Affordable Health Care Act will also shift more of the deductible payment to the worker as employers seek higher deductible plans to manage the expense of administrating the plan. The Kaiser Family Foundation says this will cost employees about $3,000 in 2013 in added premiums and higher deductibles.

Gas, groceries and health care are issues we all face but the percentage of our budget we use to pay these declines as income grows. A family of four that spends $800 per month on groceries with a $50,000 annual income isn’t going to spend $8,000 a month on groceries if they make $500,000 per year. Therefore the top earners are affected very little by the rising costs of living. Meanwhile, the social safety net continues to pick up a larger portion of the population as job growth and income stagnates at the bottom threshold.

This is the pattern that we face as a country. Bureaucrats acting in their own self-interest with horizons just past the next election are too short sighted to enact long-term legislation. This is how sequestration came into being, as leverage to force Congress into action yet, in spite of their OWN poison pill, the deficit continues to grow unchecked, the voters continue to cast their ballots and the top 10% continue to cover each others’ backs.

Not Quite Time for Gold to Shine

The gold futures market is still looking for support since reaching a high near $1,800 per ounce in early October. The market had fallen by nearly $200 per ounce as recently as early this month. Fiscal cliff issues as well as tax and estate laws fueled some of the selling. However, commercial traders were the dominant sellers above $1,700 per ounce as they sold off their summer purchases made below $1,600. I believe the gold market has one more sell-off left in it before it can turn higher with any sustainability.

Comparatively speaking, gold held its own against the Dow in 2012 with both of them registering gains around 7% for the year. However, the more nimble companies of the S&P 500 and Nasdaq soundly trounced the returns of each, registering gains of 13% and 16%, respectively. The relative advantage of gold in uncertain times may be running its course. There currently is no inflation to worry about and CEO’s are learning how to increase productivity to compensate for increased legislative costs. Finally, the S&P has risen by about 19% over the last 10 years while gold has rallied by more than 250%. Therefore, sideways market action in gold over the last couple of years seems justified.

Meanwhile, seasonal and fundamental support for gold hasn’t provided much of a kick over the last two months. Typically, the Indian wedding season creates a big source of physical demand in the gold market from late September through the New Year. In fact, the strongest seasonal period for gold is from late August through October in anticipation of this season. This effect should be gaining strength due to the rise of the middle and upper middle classes in India yet, the market seemed to absorb this support with nary a rally to be had. I think we’ll see the market’s second strongest period, which begins now, and runs through the first week of February provide us with a tradable bottom and rally point.

Finally, the last of the short-term negatives is the strength of the U.S. Dollar. The U.S. Dollar trades opposite the gold market. Gold falls when the Dollar rallies because the stronger Dollar buys more, “stuff” on the open market and while we’ve talked about commercial traders buying gold, they’ve also been buying the U.S. Dollar Index. Commercial traders have fully supported the Dollar Index at the 79.00 level. The Dollar Index traded to a low of 79.01 on December 19th followed by a recent test of that low down to 79.40. The re-test of the 79.00 low has created a bullish divergence in technical indicators suggesting that this low may be the bottom and could lead to a run back to the top of its trading range around 81.50. This can also be confirmed in the Euro Currency and the Japanese Yen. The Euro currency futures market has seen commercial traders sell more than 120,000 contracts in the last six weeks as the market has rallied from 1.29 to 1.34 per Dollar. Meanwhile Japan’s new Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, has turned the country’s monetary presses up to 11 in an attempt to jump-start their domestic economy.

The absence of an expected rally in the gold market through the last few weeks leads me to believe that the internals simply don’t support these price levels, yet. Therefore, the market will continue to seek a price low enough to attract new buyers beyond the commercial traders’ value area. Typically, this would lead to a washout of some sort that may force the gold market to test its 2012 lows around $1,540 per ounce before finding a bottom.

Furthermore, the flush in gold would most likely be accompanied by a rally in the U.S. Dollar and could push it back above the previously mentioned 81.50 level. Proper negotiation and resolution of the pending debt ceiling would most likely exacerbate both of these scenarios while also including a large stock market rally. Conversely, a legislative fiasco would lead to a Dollar washout, as the global economies would lose faith in our ability to manage ourselves and treat our markets accordingly. Therefore, in spite of the inter-market, fundamental and technical analyses we will keep our protective stops close on our long Dollar position while waiting for an opportunity to buy gold at discount prices for the long haul.

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk of loss in investing in futures.

The Stock Market Bounce is for Real

We published a sell signal for the S&P 500 in our October 4th article, “Who is Pushing the Stock Market.” Several fundamental and technical reasons were laid out. The fact that the market topped out the very next day and sold off by 9% in the last month leads me to believe that this decline may have run its course. The easy money on the sell side has been made and perhaps, we should start looking at the buy side of the market.

Separating the, “what happened” from the “why did it happen” is always tough. Throwing political variables like the election and the Euro crisis into the mix along with individual accommodations for the fiscal cliff and estate planning leaves us with very real macro and micro implications currently in play. We’ll take a brief look at these and see why the odds may be stacking up in favor of the buy side of the market.

The markets clearly viewed the election results in a negative light by selling off 6.3% in eight trading sessions. I think the markets were fully prepared for an Obama victory prior to the debates however Romney’s debate performance was just enough to make it a bit of a race. Therefore, investors chose to hold on through the election just in case Mitt pulled it off. Had Mitt won, we wouldn’t have seen the selling pressure. Obama’s victory guarantees higher taxes going forward. Therefore, many people are rebalancing their portfolios to take advantage of the tax laws as they stand in 2012. That answers some of the, “why” for the decline.

Commercial traders greeted the sell off in the markets with open arms. Traders in the Nasdaq and Dow Jones were major buyers, doubling their net long position in the Nasdaq and increasing their position in the Dow Jones by more than 50%. The major surge in commercial buying has pushed momentum back in favor of the bulls. Furthermore, combining the recent sell off with commercial trader buying has provided us with a Commitment of Traders buy signal. This is the methodology I presented at the World Traders Expo in Chicago last month.

Further bullish indicators focus on the extremely bearish sentiment of the trading public. Without getting into too much detail, many of the indicators that measure investor sentiment are exceptionally bearish. These readings typically mean the opposite is about to happen because the investing public typically does the exact opposite of what they should do. This one of the primary reasons we follow the commercial traders, rather than the small speculators.

Technically speaking, there are two key points. First of all, the sell off pushed us to a new three month low. Secondly, the about face reversal the market pulled provided indication of a major rejection of that low. The rally on the 19th was so strong that 90% of roughly 2,800 stocks traded on the NYSE closed higher. That kind of rally provides a statistically valid bottoming signal. Merrill Lynch was the first to capitalize on the statistical relevance stating that since 2006 there have been 1,733 trading days and this type of day has been observed only 62 times. The relevant pattern is that we should pause for a couple of days before resuming our climb through the 10, 20, 30 and 65 day moving averages which come in at 1372, 1388, 1404 and 1417 respectively.

One last piece of evidence of the rejection of the new three-month low made on the 16th is that the market immediately opened .5% higher and continued to climb another 1.5% for the day. The strong rally off the multi month low has only occurred 9 times since the Daily Sentiment Report has been tracking this and their research shows 7 of the 9 led to multi week bull runs. The two that didn’t pan out were both in the months following the tragic events of September 11th.

The sell off that we anticipated came to fruition however, I believe it’s much harder to turn around and buy the market when the media is so full of naysayers. To them, I would concede that not coming to an agreement on the fiscal cliff would send the stock market much lower. However, I believe that they will reach some type of settlement. The market will gyrate according to the most recent piece of news but ultimately it will climb higher. Finally, we cannot let sentiment overrule quantitative analysis. To ignore the facts would be choosing to live in ignorance.

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk of loss in investing in futures.