Tag Archives: commodity markets

Ending on a High Note

The market has stated repeatedly throughout 2010 that it’s good to own, “stuff.” Tangible assets with a finite supply have increased in value because they are known quantities. The United States and the European Union are devaluing their currencies through various forms of Quantitative easing and investors face growing concern that fiat currencies lack real meaning. The combination of low interest rates and limited supply has pushed the commodity markets to the front of the attractive investment sectors in 2010 and should continue to shine in 2011 as the U.S. economy falters under the weight of its own debt while reinventing itself as a global service provider rather than global manufacturer.

 

The commodity markets posted new investment interest highs in 18 markets in 2010. This means that almost half of all mature domestic commodity markets reported all time highs in outside investor interest. These markets not only include the headline leaders like gold, silver and oil but also cotton, which has doubled since August. Furthermore, investors are using the commodity markets to hedge their own portfolios in the face of uncertainty in the cash markets. Three commodity markets reached all time highs in investor interest on the short side. The S&P 500, 10 year Treasury Note and the Euro currency all set new records in 2010 for net investor short interest. These markets were sold in record numbers in anticipation of stock market declines in February, an expected rise in Treasury yields in April and a weakening of the Euro currency in May.

 

The stock and bond markets are unlikely to lure money away from the commodity markets in 2011. I think it’s very likely that we’ll see our economy slip back into recession by the third quarter of 2011 with unemployment climbing above 10.5% and moving past 11%. Generally speaking, the economy needs to create more than 100,000 jobs per month to hold the unemployment rate steady from the previous month. Eight million jobs have been lost since the recession began in December of 2007. Those jobs have not been replaced since the National Bureau of Economic Research signaled the end of the recession this past June. In fact, Princeton economist Paul Krugman states that the economy needs to create 250,000 jobs per month, every month, for the next five years just to get back to where we were before it all hit the fan in ’07. Finally, small business creation and growth is what drives the employment picture and the National Federation of Independent Businesses monthly surveys simply do not support a robust recovery picture.

 

This general picture is further supported by the most recent commitment of traders data commercial trader momentum in the S&P 500 turned negative to join the Dow and Nasdaq, which had already turned. Negative momentum across all three major indexes has been a reliable forecaster of topping action in the stock markets including the recent tops in April. When we combine this with the strong buying action across the short to mid term treasuries this past week, it’s clear that professional money is moving to safer bets to start the new year.

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk of loss in investing in futures.

Coffee Topping Out?

Traditional agricultural commodity markets have always been subject to supply disruptions. Think about the mid-west flooding of the mid 90’s, mad cow disease, Florida orange crop freezes as well as labor strikes and political coups. Almost two months ago, we talked about trading the coffee market. We noted that the two major growing regions both had weather related problems and that’s what was driving up the price. There’s one other primary reason for commodity market supply shocks and that is the lack of substitute goods.

 

All commodity markets have very specific contract specifications that must be met in order for a producer to deliver their product to the exchange’s warehouses. The coffee market in the U.S., which is the by far the most dominant, accepts delivery on Arabica beans through 19 global warehouses. Arabica beans only make up about one third of the coffee crop and are the source for premium coffee blends. Robusta coffee is much more common. Robusta coffee is used in instant coffee and coffee blends because it grows quicker, is a hardier plant and has high caffeine content.

 

The coffee market has seen supply shortages before. In 1996, total warehouse stocks declined to 321 bags. This meant the New York Board of Trade, now the Intercontinental Exchange, had just over 42,000 pounds of coffee on hand to meet global delivery demands. Consequently, prices shot up to more than $3 per pound at the exchange. By contrast, the current supply, which is down 44% for the year, puts the exchange’s coffee stocks at 1.7 million bags for December. Arabica coffee producers in Brazil and Central America ramped up production in the wake of 96’s shortage. Those trees began to produce around 2000 and the coffee market bottomed in 2002 on the flood of their second harvest.

 

Much of this coffee has been sitting in storage for years and remained in the system through a loophole in which producers would take delivery of their own old stock and then resubmit it for certification. The bags then came in as new stock. Recently, this coffee has been making onto the market. Coffee roasters have taken delivery from the exchange only to find that the beans they bought were unusable. As a direct result of this, the Intercontinental Exchange has rewritten the delivery specification for their coffee contract to protect the integrity of the exchange and in doing so, created an interesting setup for a commodity trade.

 

First of all, they are now penalizing warehouse stocks more than 720 days old. This closes up the delivery and retender loophole. Secondly, they are going to begin accepting robusta coffee beans at a discounted value as deliverable against the Arabica contract. This will open up the delivery ports of the ICE’s 19 world -wide warehouses to a global supply of fresh, deliverable coffee. Furthermore, this develops multiple production centers and weakens Brazil and Central America’s ability to monopolize the prices by controlling more than 50% of global Arabica bean production.

 

Commodity traders will see these changes manifest themselves in increased exchange liquidity, which translates into lower volatility with fewer and milder price spikes. Volatility will also be eased as Brazil continues pour money into the development of its own infrastructure with more than 1 billion dollars currently earmarked specifically for coffee production.

 

When we last talked about coffee, we noted that commercial consumers had been buyers of the market to lock in end line production costs. Trend following commodity index traders as well as small speculative traders have climbed aboard coffee’s upward trend as it has marched to 13- year highs. However, general coffee market sources have priced in a balance of trade ceiling around $2.70 per pound, which is about 15% higher than the current market price. The bearish combination of the exchange’s rewriting of the contract specifications combined with the market nearing its pre-forecasted top leads me to believe that commercial producers will begin selling this market in earnest in order to lock in their forward production at these attractive prices. We will watch this development closely. It has the makings of a bull market climax.

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk of loss in investing in futures.

Diversification is not Immunization

Every market crash or bursting bubble is like the ice cream truck calling kids to the street. Portfolio managers and re-balancers know they get the opportunity to truly be heard only when something goes wrong.

Most people live their lives reacting to new stimulus. If something hurts, they don’t do it again. If something works, there’s no reason to change. Portfolio managers attempt to anticipate areas of pain and mitigate that pain wherever possible. However, there are times when efficient portfolio analysis, modern portfolio theory and just plain common-sense investing will still force one to endure periods of pain.

Portfolio composition is usually based on a collection of assets that tend to relate to each other in a predefined and expected way.

There are three basic relationships:

— Positive correlations: Two asset classes rise or fall together, predictably.

— Negative correlations: One class rises when the other falls and vice versa, predictably.

— Non-correlational: No predictable relationship.

The right balance of these relationships across multiple asset classes will smooth out returns and help to insure the predictable performance of one’s portfolio.

There’s an old saying from statistics 101: “Correlation does not equal causation.” We can measure how markets move relative to each other, but without understanding their relationships, we can’t say for certain what caused what. Sometimes, understanding “why” has a bigger impact on one’s portfolio than the actual mix of assets.

Last week we saw many markets fall. The stock market is lower, as are precious metals, bonds, grains, coffee, sugar, cocoa, crude oil and the energy markets. Many of the classic market relationships people use to balance their portfolios failed to behave in the anticipated manner and did not balance the risks associated with investing. Markets can and do, behave in unanticipated ways.

Commodity markets have been trending toward generally higher prices. The stock market has also had a nice rally and is up more than 9 percent since Labor Day. During this time, the Federal Reserve Board also announced a second round of quantitative easing to keep interest rates low and weaken the U.S. dollar. Consequently, bonds have rallied in price while the dollar has fallen.

The sudden about-face in many of the markets is twofold. First, the news regarding Ireland’s financial health has become increasingly pessimistic. Ireland was on the financial default radar, along with Greece, more than six months ago. Ireland has been very proactive in implementing domestic austerity measures to rein in spending. Furthermore, Ireland has also steadfastly maintained its financial issues are limited to a few banks that became overleveraged during their own housing bubble.

Unfortunately, the European Union has the same fears about Ireland and Greece we did in the U.S. with our own domestic banks and that is that every bank was more overextended than initially thought, requiring an even bigger lifeline to maintain solvency. Finally, Portugal and Spain are also on the verge of financial insolvency themselves.

The second fear to hit the markets was China’s announcement Wednesday its economy may be overheating again. Rumors are circulating China may follow several banks in Korea in raising its interest rates to slow down inflation and thus, economic growth. The data coming out of China certainly reinforces the idea it may constrict lending in the near future. China has a published cap on the amount of money its nationalized bank will lend in any calendar year and it is quickly approaching that ceiling.  The fears are also evident in China’s stock market, which has slid more than 5 percent in the last few sessions.

These two events combined to cause havoc in our domestic markets as they immediately unraveled the underpinnings of our market rallies. The Chinese news sucked the demand out of the commodity markets. China’s clampdown on inflation is pulling money out of the commodity markets and reducing overseas demand for raw materials. The news from Ireland and the European Union has the equity markets spooked. For many investors, the 50-percent correction in the equity markets from our own financial crisis is all too real and all too recent. Our domestic stock market’s rally and the quickly approaching year’s end makes it easy for many traders and investors to simply pull money out of the markets.

News events shock the markets and broadly sweeping economic forces create seismic shifts in market behavior. During these turbulent times, typical market relationships may fail to behave in the predicted manner.

As the Chinese economy becomes a first class consumer, we must accept our role as a supplier, rather than our historical position of end line consumer. As a supplier, we need to recognize the demand-needs of our trading partners. This is a broadly sweeping change that will affect the commodity markets for years to come.

News from Ireland and the European Union can shock the stock market, reawakening nightmares of 2008, but plans can be made to account for these events.

It does require proactive management of one’s portfolio. The old days of the passive hedge and allocation strategies may be gone.

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk of loss in investing in futures.

Stock Market Players are Increasing their Bets

There’s a difference between a tradeable rally and a fundamentally sound trend. The stock market has been exceptionally strong since Labor Day, turning positive for the year around the middle of September. During this period the two dominant news themes have been the Republican party’s campaign gaining momentum and the Federal Reserve Board’s verbalization of their willingness to do whatever it takes to keep the economy churning. Additionally, we are heading into the strongest seasonal period for the stock market on an annual basis. When these factors are combined with equity managers who have to put money to work on the long side to keep pace with the index, we see a stock market that defies logic by gaining momentum as it rallies.

 

The S&P has had three outside bars in the last five trading sessions. Typical market movement is just over one outside bar per month. Analysis of these three days shows that they all started lower based on overnight concerns and finished higher on the day’s trading here in the U.S. Whether the buying that came in was from fund managers trying to get capital into the market at a discount, traders covering their short positions or foreign money coming in to buy our equities at a dollar denominated discount is irrelevant. Buying is buying.

 

We’ve clearly identified the trend is higher. There are sectors with fundamental support like Potash, ADM, ConAgra, Freeport McMoran and so forth. These commodity based companies should rally in an economic environment dominated by a declining dollar. It’s good to own, “stuff.” In fact, the basic materials sector is up over 20% on the year, led by precious metals. An argument can also be made that the historically low interest rates have created a new type of carry trade, where borrowed money is being put to work owning, “stuff.”

 

The flip side of the stock market’s rally combines technical resistance, bearish commercial positions and a deteriorating labor market. Technically, resistance comes in another 2.5% higher around the April highs at 1200. Also, the market has lost about 15% of its open interest since making the August lows. Healthy trends are supposed to gain open interest as they progress.

 

Moving to the commercial positions, the open interest peak at the August lows coincided with the last commercial net long position. Over the last couple of weeks, the commercial traders have moved to a dead net short position. This includes a record short position in the Nasdaq. This type of behavior is a perfect illustration of why we follow the commercial traders. Small speculators and funds were accumulating short positions at the August lows while the commercial traders were buying the market against them. We are seeing the exact opposite play at the market’s top, right now. Small speculators and funds are putting money to work in the market as the commercial traders have gone from long position liquidation to outright short position initiation over the last two months.

 

Finally, the public unemployment rate held steady at 9.6% for the month of September. However, looking deeper into the data, we see that the economy has added only one month’s worth of new jobs over the last year and 90% of those jobs have gone to hiring workers over the age of 65. Employers are paying minimum wage for experience and reliability, not rebuilding long- term work forces. The data also shows that part time workers for, “economic reasons,” which means they can’t find full time employment is the highest ever recorded. The last piece of doom and gloom comes from Richmond Federal Economic Conditions Survey, which shows that companies are issuing a hiring freeze with the one of the largest single month declines that the Number of Employees Index recorded in the last decade. This is reinforced by the plunge in the Workweek index and the New Orders Index.

 

We may be approaching a climactic event in the stock market. The data spreads that went into crating this article have never been wider. The Federal Reserve Board is talking about a second round of quantitative easing. Their dialogue has created a rush into tangible assets like the commodity markets. It is supplying an artificial floor for the stock market and it has created a rush to buy short and medium treasuries. These moves are based on conjecture and hyperbole. What if the Fed sits tight? The markets have provided the Fed with the action they’ve been unable to create through their own actions. Inflation, low interest rates and a healthy stock market are exactly what they’ve been trying to construct. What happens when these bubbles burst?

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk of loss in investing in futures.

 

Bucking the Dollar’s Decline

The main argument supporting inflation is based on the current prices in the commodity markets. The argument postulates that the massive injections of capital through low interest rates and the government’s active purchase of long term treasuries is debasing the U.S dollar and making our products cheaper on the international market. The logic is sound in assuming that price paid has a direct relation to the exchange rate. However, since 2007, the U.S. Dollar Index is down less than 5%. This doesn’t seem so bad on the surface until one considers that because the U.S. Dollar Index is trade weighted with more than 40% of its allocation going to the Euro currency futures, it doesn’t accurately reflect the Dollar’s value against the developing Asian nations and thus, the world.

 

United States’ businesses have made their profit margin through purchasing goods and services overseas at a favorable exchange rate and reselling them domestically for years. As a country, we have enjoyed our success for many years. During this process, we helped to develop an economic infrastructure overseas that we failed to remain competitive with domestically. The economies in these countries have continued to develop and strengthen and so have their currencies. We’ve seen the Dollar decline by more than 20% against the Indian Rupee and nearly 30% against the Japanese Yen since ’07. The Chinese Yuan/Renminbi is artificially capped by their government and has only been allowed to rise 7% against the Dollar over this same period.

 

The fact that the countries we’ve done business with for years are now stealing some of our economic thunder should come as no surprise. We’ve witnessed this story throughout history as cultures adapt new foreign technologies to their own use and use their production advantages of cheap labor, fewer legal restrictions and years’ worth of foreign direct investment to implement the same business plan in their own country, thus exploiting their own competitive edge in labor and capital, just like we did here, 100 years ago.

 

Productive land is the only production input with any upward price pressure. The inflation argument based on commodity prices is domestically tied to the agricultural land component of the economic equation. We have not seen inflation in labor as our own unemployment rate hovers under 10%. We have not seen inflation in the capital markets as the Federal Reserve Board recently committed to near zero interest rates for the foreseeable future. Finally, non- agricultural land has seen a crash in the housing market, which is being followed by the commercial market. Arable farmland and mineral deposits are the only sources of upward price pressure.  The growing middle class of India, China and other Asian nations is creating a consumption premium in the finite goods that must be grown or mined through their new found purchasing power.

 

Fortunately, we are able to benefit from the growing agricultural demand to help offset the years of domestic overspending. The United States still holds a strong lead in grain production. U.S. grain exports are on a tear this year and are expected to continue. China has been an importer of corn for the first time in 14 years and their soybean imports are up more than 5% from last year. We should be able to exploit this advantage as the developing middle class in India, China and the rest of Asia continue to move up the personal consumption ladder, which includes eating more of what they want and less of what they can afford. We will also see a surge in textiles and technology purchases as their disposable income climbs.

 

The net result of this is a changing shift in the floor prices for commodities as the world adapts to new levels of consumption and global production catches up. The old normal of $4 beans and $400 gold is long gone. The panic low of the economic meltdown in December of ’08 was $4.40 in soybeans and $700 in gold. Markets like corn and sugar never broke their upward trends. Currently, corn is supported by China’s continued imports while India remains the largest gold consumer.

 

The most compelling case, in my opinion, is in soybeans. Soybeans are fully supported by both China and India through solid demand in feed and cooking products. Technically, the soybean market has been trapped in a $2 sideways range for more than a year, trading between $8.75 and $10.50. Furthermore, as of January of this year, commercial traders, via the Commitment of Traders Report had actually accumulated, and held a net long position in this market until the recent test of the $10.50 highs. This implies that both soybean producers and end production consumers believe this area to be, “fair value.” Finally, we are on the cusp of the seasonally strongest time of year for the active soybean commodity futures contract. Therefore, any disruption in supply could generate a violent breakout higher, easily approaching $12.50 per bushel or, $10,000 per futures contract.

 

The United States will continue to benefit from our major advantage in farmable land and push it’s agricultural technology efficiencies to the utmost. Unfortunately, as a country, we would be lucky to cover 2% of the national debt through agricultural profits. A better personal finance option is to put the only source of domestic inflation to work by studying the markets themselves and learning how to take advantage of the supply and demand dynamics of a global agricultural imbalance.

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk in investing in futures.

Commercial Trader’s Role in the Stock Index Futures

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk in investing in futures.

The stock market’s recent sell off between 7.5% and 14% depending on the index, was immediately followed by five straight day’s worth of rally. Apparently, the TV pundits are saying that the electronic meltdown was just what the market needed to attract fresh buying to the markets and push them back to 2007’s happy market levels. Unfortunately, based on commercial traders’ positions, they don’t seem to share the talking heads rosy outlook. In fact, their trading actions appear to favor, “The Coming Double Dip,” opinion.

Throughout the month of April, commercial traders have been steadily building short positions in the stock index futures. The behavior of the institutional trader is to vary their short position in the stock indexes to offset their perceived sense of risk in the stock positions they currently own in their portfolios. The execution of short hedges in the stock index futures allows them to hold on to their individual issues. The ability to protect their portfolio without having to sell individual issues also protects them from incurring capital gains penalties on their core positions. Thus by tracking commercial traders’ momentum we can get a feel for not only their positive or, negative outlook on the stock market but also their sense of urgency.

Individual investors need to know what options are out there to help them protect their hard earned equity portfolios. The stock index futures offer direct hedges to the Nasdaq, Dow, S&P 500 and Russell 2000 indexes. These markets cover everything from blue chips to heavy tech and small cap. They also trade in various size contracts to help tailor hedge positions to your underlying investments.At these levels, the small contracts have approximately the following cash values:

Market                 Cash Value        Margin RequirementS&P 500                      $56,500                  $5,625Dow Jones                  $52,500                  $6,500Nasdaq                        $18,750                   $3,500Russell 2000                $68,000                  $5,250

Using the above values, one can see the effectiveness of using futures to hedge an equity position, rather than a Contra, Profund or, other inverse equity mutual fund through the following example.

John Doe has $250,000 in equity positions through individual stocks, mutual funds and retirement plans. John is afraid that the market’s rally has run its course and given the overall economic outlook, would like to be able to protect his portfolio in the event of a downturn. Unfortunately, John has had some of the individual stocks for so long that his cost basis makes selling them and paying capital gains taxes an unappealing option. Several of his mutual funds are held in various retirement accounts run by managers who don’t solicit investment advice from their clients on a regular basis. Finally, John has another $75,000 in cash, short term rates and money markets. He considers this his operating cash for any opportunities or emergencies that might come up. So, what can John do protect his self in the event of a market downturn without tying up all of his free cash?

Assuming he would like to hedge half of his portfolio, he would determine the makeup of his holdings to see how he’d like to balance his hedge – small cap, blue chip, tech, etc. Now, he wants to give himself room for another 10% higher in the equities due to the “January Effect” or, market exuberance. Therefore, the free cash needed for this strategy would be approximately, $16,000 in margin to carry the equivalent of a $125,000 short equity mutual fund. Plus, he’s going to need an extra $12,500 to provide a cushion of another 10% rally in the equities. His total free cash outlay is $28,500. Thus, he effectively hedges half of his equity position while tying up only 25% of his operating cash.

The commitment of traders report for the stock indexes can be a good barometer for anticipated movement in the stock market. Furthermore, through the use of stock index futures and a competent broker, individuals can implement the same type of equity protection as the big boys.

Please call with any questions.Andy Waldock866-990-0777

Uncovering Value in the Commodity Markets

Uncovering Value in the Commodity Markets

The electronic meltdown in the stock market also cued a selloff in many commodity markets. Typically, markets move in their own individual rhythms. However, when fear dispossesses logic and panic takes over, it becomes a case of sell first and ask questions later. As the stock market selloff accelerated and we watched the media reports of the riots in Greece, survival became the primary concern. Now that the dust has settled, it’s time to appraise the current state of the markets. I believe the shock to the system uncovered some fruitful trading opportunities.

First, let’s examine the context of the markets prior to the selloff. In the currency markets, the Australian and Canadian Dollar as well as the Japanese Yen had been consolidating near the upper end of their ranges. All three had been holding their own since the U.S. Dollar’s rally has come, primarily, at the expense of the Euro, Swiss Franc and British Pound. The same pattern appears in the metals and energies as gold, silver and platinum as well as heating oil, unleaded and crude had also had been consolidating near their highs.

Secondly, let’s consider the composition of the markets’ participants through the Commitment of Traders Report at these price levels. Commercial trader positions in the markets above were gaining momentum in the direction of their established trends with the only exception being the silver market. This means that even as the markets were moving higher, the traders we follow, commercial hedgers, anticipated higher prices yet to come. For our purpose, we track the commercial hedgers. Prior to the market shock, we presumed that we were in a value driven futures market and no one knows fair value like the people who produce it or, have to use it. In fact, it is precisely their sense of value that provides the commodity market’s rhythmic meanderings that swing traders love so much. Let’s face it, producers know when their product is overvalued and it should be sold just as well as end line users know when they should be stocking up at low prices.

Finally, in the wake of “Volatility’s Perfect Storm,” we have seen the commodity markets snap back from losses of 3% – 4% in the world currency markets to 7% – 10% in the physical commodity markets. This sharp selloff and snap back to the previous range of consolidation prices is called a “Spike and Ledge” formation in technical analysis and pattern recognition. Typically, this occurs when an outside force creates a counter trend shock to the market and scares everyone out. The fear of being in the market is replaced immediately by the fear of NOT being in the market and missing the move. The shock forces out the market’s weaker players while allowing the strong to accumulate more positions at better prices. This is why COT Signals has been kicking out buy signals since the meltdown. Following the commercial trader positions has allowed us to buy into oversold markets. Our targets for these positions can be calculated by adding the depth of the market’s decline to the top of the consolidation levels. If the market you’re following sold off 5% from its highs, a spike and ledge projected target is 5% above the market’s previous highs and a protective stop would be placed just beyond the spike.

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk in investing in futures.

 

Volatility’s Perfect Storm

Volatility’s Perfect Storm

I’ve been actively trading the stock indices – S&P 500, Nasdaq, Russell 2000 and Dow futures for 20 years and I’ve never seen a day like today. It was truly a, “Perfect Storm.” I believe this will happen more and more frequently in the future as the three main reasons for May 6th’s volatility are gaining momentum all of the time.

First, public complacency was the highest it has been since the summer of 2007. Every bailout and new government program bolsters the warm and fuzzy investor psyche that allows us to believe everything will work out. The Volatility index measures the cost of protecting your stock portfolio through the purchase of put options. Put options are like buying portfolio insurance. If you hedged your $300,000 stock portfolio it would have cost you approximately $8,500 in put premium to protect the full value of that portfolio through June, from any downside risk. That same insurance policy in the afternoon would have been worth $23,625. Considering the value of your portfolio equaled the decline of the stock market, you would’ve lost 3.25% on your $300,000 or, $9,750. The difference between the $8,500 paid up front versus the current portfolio’s value of $290,250 plus the current value of the insurance policy $23,625 means that your net worth on the stock market’s biggest point loss day in history would have actually INCREASED by $5,375. The increase in the VIX is the reason for the inflated option premium and the magnitude of the rally of the VIX bears testament to the market’s general complacency.

Secondly, All of the markets are tied to each other. That’s why we are Commodity AND Derivative Advisors. In the age of electronic commodity trading, one issue always affects another one and that one in turn, affects another on and so on. Every trade in an outright market like the S&P 500, Euro Currency or, Japanese Yen will have an effect on the other markets related to it. This has, in effect, created one giant butterfly effect. In the age of algorithmic trading, where the minutest of market inefficiencies are exploited by aggressive capital placement, abnormal market moves will become self fueling. Many of these models use markers based on the model’s expectation of, “normal,” relationships to its data points. When things get pushed beyond the model’s, “normal,” expectations you have a case of, “If you liked stock ABC at $12 a share, you’re going to love it at $4 a share.” There were at least two stocks in the S&P 500 that traded to 0, today. This means they were broke, bankrupt, didn’t exist. Two Fortune 500 companies disappeared on someone’s lunch break and by the time the employee got home from work, no one knew the difference. Twenty minutes of electronic market butterfly effect.

Finally, as the market began to fall, the media was showing the Greek police force in full riot gear after passing their severe austerity vote in an attempt to procure financing from the European Union. Furthermore, the context of the day’s discussion among the talking head TV pundits was the doom and gloom surrounding the demise of the European Union, civil protest and bankruptcy in Greece with the specter of Spain’s impending default as a backdrop. Doom and Gloom sells. Traders, both retail and institutional are listening to the end of the world as we know it while watching the stock market meltdown and trading programs are ticking off one sell order after another in an attempt to be the first ones to market with their orders. The pursuit of greater bandwidth on their data feeds, faster processors in their computers and deeper levels of quantifiable algorithms put them in the lead in the race to the bottom and right back up. Welcome to the new age of 24 hour doom and gloom media coverage, total connectivity and computer programs replacing common sense trading. We specialize in common sense trading.

 

This methodology is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. This method is meant for educational purposes and to illustrate the correlation between the commercial’s trading and its effect on creating turning points within the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk in investing in futures. The information contained herein comes from sources believed to be reliable, but are not guaranteed as to accuracy or, completeness.

 

U.S. Mint Gold Coins


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This blog is published by Andy
Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst, broker and asset manager.
Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself, his family, or, his
clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for educational purposes and
to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets.
The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and may not be suitable
for all investors. There is substantial risk in investing in futures.

I came across this in the Casey Daily Dispatch, this morning. Due to the number of inquiries into taking physical possession of Gold Bullion, I thought I’d post this as a reasonable means of physical acquisition. Please understand that this is neither a recommendation to buy physical gold nor, a solicitation for the resellers listed in the following post.

Generally speaking, Gold is a hedge against U.S. Dollar depreciation. It has been my experience that this hedge is more easily executed via the futures markets than in the physical market. However, in the best interest of our customers, I’ll always try to provide you with the best information I can find. After all, the only bad decision is a poorly informed decision.

Buffaloes Are Back!

By Jeff Clark

You may recall the U.S. Mint stopped producing the American Gold
Buffalo coin late last year when demand for all things gold and silver
skyrocketed and they couldn’t keep up. I was personally disappointed, because I
love that coin.

Well, I’m glad to report it’s back on sale! Beginning this
Thursday, October 22, you can once again buy the 2009 Gold Buffalo. The U.S. Mint
is officially releasing the coin for sale that day, and you can purchase them
from the Mint directly or from any dealer who’s got them available.

What many people don’t know is that the Gold Buffalo is the only
U.S.-minted 24-karat gold coin. Wait, you’re saying, isn’t the American Eagle
24 karats? Nope, it’s a 23-karat coin; it contains one ounce of gold, but it
also contains an alloy, about 10%, presumably to make it sturdier. The Buffalo
contains no alloy and is thus the purest form of gold you can buy.

If you’d like to own a Buffalo, I’d suggest calling Asset
Strategies International (1-800-831-0007). Why? Even though you can’t buy it
today, they’ll take your name and number now and then call you on Thursday to
lock in a price. They’ve also got the best price I’ve seen: they’re currently
asking a 6% premium (or lower for larger orders).

This is a better deal than Kitco, for example, because they’re not
taking orders yet and also said their premium is likely to be at least 8.25%.
Keep in mind, though, that premiums could easily be forced up if the demand,
like last time, is strong. I suspect it will be for this popular coin.

If you think the gold price is going to fall and could thus get it
cheaper, I’ll mention that the U.S. Mint projects they’ll produce enough coins
to keep up with demand. This doesn’t mean your dealer couldn’t run out, but
hopefully the mint’s calculations are correct and there will still be plenty of
coins available at later times. No guarantees, though, and premiums will certainly
fluctuate.

Tradeable Data

This blog is published by Andy Waldock. Andy Waldock is a trader, analyst,commodity broker and asset manager. Therefore, Andy Waldock may have positions for himself,his family, or, his clients in any market discussed. The blog is meant for edu-cational purposes and to develop a dialogue among those with an interest in the commodity markets. The commodity markets employ a high degree of leverage and maynot be suitable for all investors. There is substantial risk in investing in futures.The talking heads on the financial networks are more interested in arguing andhearing their own voices on tv than they are with examining the data that we at our disposal to make rational decisions. Currently, the debate rages between “double diprecession vs. Dow 10,000,” the ever popular “inflation vs. deflation” and finally, “stimulus vs. private growth.” These debates do nothing to help individual traders andinvestors find the facts before them based on data that is readily available.In 30 seconds or less,the data tells us that deflation should be our major concern. 1) there is no inflationary pressure in the three keystones of economics. a) land. pick your place and make an offer. b) labor. the unemployment numbers speak for themselves. c) capital. government stimulus and 0% interest is available to anyone who can wade through the paperwork. 2) The stock market has been overinflated by the surviving financial companies that have been allowed to borrow at 0% from the government and lend at whatever rate they can charge. Earnings are on the tail end of the short term tag team spike that has been provided buy government stimulus and cost cutting. 3) The dollar is likely to put in a bottom near these levels. The metals are set to decline. Copper failed to make new highs on this run up, in spite of the Chinese stock piling. Speculative positions in the metal markets are at their peak leaving little money on the sideline. Now, let’s put this in tradeable language. 1) The Commitment of Trader Reports show that the Dollar has shown a tremendous build up of commercial net long positions – moving from net short over 30,000 contracts last October to currently, net long 12,000 contracts. The lows around 76 should be defended. 2) Copper’s failure to make new highs provides solid resistance $2.85 – $2.95 to sell rallies against. London’s stock piles are high and the Chinese stimulus is petering out. 3) Gold has seen a huge build in speculative long positions above $990. The rally to $1025 hasn’t left a lot of room to take profits. Under $990 could see substantial stop loss selling by weakly financed speculators.