Category Archives: Macro Economics

Renzi’s Great Gamble

Renzi’s Great Gamble

By Nick Andrews and Stefano Capacci
August 24, 2016

Prime ministers come and go in Italy – four since the financial crisis – but precious little seems to change. The latest incumbent, Matteo Renzi, has pursued structural reform more energetically than his predecessors. But for all the progress he has made, he might as well have been wading through molasses. Now, in a bid to secure a popular mandate for his restructuring program, Renzi has bet his premiership on a referendum over badly-needed constitutional reforms. It is a high stakes gamble.

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Hoisington Investment Management – Quarterly Review and Outlook, Second Quarter 2016

By Dr. Lacy Hunt and Van Hoisington

The Separate Constraints of Deficit Spending and Debt

Real per capita GDP has risen by a paltry 1.3% annualized since the current expansion began in 2009. This is less than half of the 2.7% average expansion since the records began in 1790. One of the most persistent impediments to growth has been the drag from fiscal policy, a constraint that is likely to become even more severe in the next decade. The standard of living, or real median household income, has only declined in the 2009-2016 expansion and stands at the same level reached in 1996.

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Cattle Finding a Bottom Into Summer

Cattle prices have been on a downward trend since the 2014 highs. August feeder cattle, as we’ll discuss specifically, are trading at $143 per hundred weight(cwt), last year they were at $194 and at $182 the year before that. Over the last ten years there have only been two significant periods under our current prices. We’ll examine the placement and marketing numbers as well as the choice vs select spread as it relates to the domestic demand we believe will drive prices seasonally higher through the end of the summer.

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Unemployment Report Catches Big Money Off Guard

Our focus on the commercial trader population within the Commodity Futures Trading Commissions’ (CFTC) weekly Commitments of Traders (COT) report is based upon the premise that these people are some of the most well connected members of today’s financial world. Much of the weight we give them is based on years of watching their positions build and decline in conjunction with the economic news of a given market. Their timing is uncannily accurate. Therefore, when their actions forecast a given scenario ahead of an important news event, we take note. When the news, like this morning’s unemployment report, moves the market further against their position, we REALLY take note.

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Global Economic Slack to End Commodity Rally

This year began with a bang. Our forecasting models accurately predicted many of 2016’s early commodity rallies in metals, energies and grains. Our models also expressed the notion that while these rallies would be sharp, there was little evidence to suggest that this was anything more than a temporary spike in a deflating global economy. Therefore, the persistence of these rallies has been the biggest surprise of the year. However, the same factors that have led us to believe that these rallies would be temporary have only increased their alarm. This week, we’ll examine the primary component of our deflationary argument while also shedding some light on an inspired tweak to an existing measure of global economic activity.

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Using the COT Report to Forecast Interest Rates

The U.S. Treasury Bond market has been held hostage for the last year as the developed world argues about economic stimulus. The argument began to grow back in December of 2014 as Janet Yellen and the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) stated, “The committee considers it unlikely to begin the normalization process for at least the next couple of meetings.” This sent rates plummeting and Treasury Bond and stock prices screaming higher. This move was widely anticipated and was perhaps, the last choreographed move between the Treasury and its markets’ participants as market participation since then has declined dramatically. This has left the biggest traders in the deepest markets debating domestic Fed policy in a world of increasingly negative interest rates, while raising domestic rates for the first time in nearly 10 years.

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Canadian Dollar Selling Opportunity at $.80 to the U.S. Dollar

The Canadian Dollar is primarily a commodity based currency. Whether the commodity is being  extracted, processed or exported, the commodity itself touches a lot of Canadian hands on its way out the door. As such, it’s not surprising that the recent commodity rally has sparked a bid in the Canadian Dollar just as the oil and grain washout contributed to its oversold condition at the beginning of this year. This week, we’ll look at some fundamental background, then illustrate the current situation and the setup we see coming on the included Canadian Dollar weekly and daily charts.

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Mechanically Profiting in Confounding Markets

There are times in any endeavor when the stars align and the proper course of action is as clear as a bell. We’ve all had our moments when even we knew we, “were on a roll.” However, most of life’s endeavors and their eventual successes come simply from the honest trudge of hard work and dedication to a specific task. This explains the late 2015 early 2016 success as many of the commodity market were displaying classic commercial trader group clues which we discussed frequently in our Commitment of Traders analysis. This led to catching several of the market rallies like the metals, energies and grains. However, as these moves have disconnected over the last month or so, the next set of predictions becomes much more difficult. This week, we’ll look at the issue of profitable trading via mechanical programs while using the interest rate sector as a barometer for the general markets’ confusion as the global rate picture remains one of the biggest variables.

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Bond Spreads Paint Bleak Economic Picture

We’ve been tracking the interest rate complex even more closely since October when we saw the commercial traders beginning to place their bets ahead the Federal Reserve Board’s (FRB) December meeting and while we’d like to take credit for the predominantly correct calls in the interest rate sector through 2015, we really have to chalk it up to knowing who to follow. The commercial traders have done a great job of anticipating both the FRB’s actions and the market’s reactions. Join us as we determine how their recent actions have affected the bond markets and what the spread movement in this market sector could mean to the broader economy going forward.

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